It Could Be YOUR Voice on WRTI!

You’ve heard them before…the voices of listeners on the air, sharing stories about why they love WRTI. That could be you! We’d like to know: What keeps you listening? Why is WRTI important to you? And if you’re a member, why do you support WRTI? You’re cordially invited to the WRTI studios on Temple University’s campus to record your own testimonial. And while you’re here, we’ll show you around the station.
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On Sunday, August 30th at 3 pm on WRTI hear the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra as it celebrates the conclusion of its 75th season. It’s a challenging concert that includes the premiere of a new work, along with performances of Tchaikovsky and Mahler.

If you like your Russian served up rare – as only The Philadelphia Orchestra can prepare it – you are in for a special treat! This Sunday, August 30, it's a re-broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra's St. Petersburg Festival, Week One concert from last January, conducted by Yannick Nezet-Seguin.

The broadcast features no fewer than three 40/40 works: “Winter,” from A. Glazunov’s The Seasons, and two of five movements from Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker, all coming in the first half of the program. After intermission, you'll hear Tchaikovsky’s spectacular Symphony No. 5.

Drummer Jamison Ross: An Instant Connection

Aug 27, 2015

Jamison is the debut of a significant talent. Winner of the 2012 Thelonious Monk Jazz Competition, the singularly entertaining Jamison Ross is a drummer of enormous presence and an irrepressible bandleader, judging from his album release show I attended at Dizzy’s Club Coca Cola in June.

Jessica Griffin

The Philadelphia Orchestra has over 100 musicians, and as many stories - often inspiring and surprising.  WRTI’s Susan Lewis profiles Bob Cafaro, a cellist in the Orchestra since 1985, whose artistry is matched by his determination to live fully, both onstage and off.  

Summer CD Roundup

Aug 23, 2015

James Horner: Pas de Deux
Disillusionment with atonal contemporary music then being written drove the young James Horner to film scoring. In November 2014, after years of movie successes, the 61-year-old film composer (Titanic, Avatar, The Amazing Spider-Man) returned to the concert hall with a triumph, his Double Concerto for violin and cello. The work was premiered by its dedicatees, the Norwegian Samuelsen siblings Mari and Hakon.

Chances are that you're familiar with the names of some of the most popular French Impressionists - Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edouard Manet, Camille Pissarro, Edgar Degas - and some of their most iconic paintings. And chances are that you've never heard of the man who devoted his career to generating a market and public acceptance of their works.  WRTI's Meridee Duddleston has the story.

Calling all design geeks and fans of cool album art! Check out this thing we made.

It tells the story of graphic designer Denise Burt and her album covers. Read about her process, see the art — and hear the music that inspired her.

Shortly after Burt moved to Copenhagen in 2000, she landed a job creating album covers for Denmark's Dacapo Records. Trouble was, she didn't know a thing about the contemporary classical music the label specialized in.

In its inaugural season, the Pennsylvania Philharmonic performed for 15,000 students in Pennsylvania’s many small cities and towns from Bethlehem to Pottstown, to Oxford, and York and points in between. In its second season (2015-2016), the orchestra will continue its mission of exposing middle schoolers to the magic of classical music. While some students will deepen their experience over last year, others will see and hear a full orchestra for the very first time. 

Former Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Christoph Eschenbach was awarded The Ernst von Siemens Music Prize for a life in the service of music this past May.

As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, music helped heal the emotional wounds Eschenbach suffered as a child in World War II, after he lost both parents. Eschenbach’s mother died at his birth, and his father, an active anti-Nazi, died in a punishment battalion sent to the front. Rescued from a refugee camp in 1945 by his mother’s cousin, the five-year-old Christoph didn’t speak for a year—until he started piano lessons.

Dilworth Park at Philadelphia’s City Hall boasts new attractions - including greenery, a café, and a fountain that becomes an ice skating rink in winter. But the newly redesigned space also draws attention to older works of art and a family that made its mark on the city for nearly a century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, one need only...to look up.


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