Yo-Yo Ma and The Philadelphia Orchestra LIVE on WRTI: Tribute to John Williams, May 1st at 2 PM

The celebrated cello maestro Yo-Yo Ma kicks off a two-week Philadelphia Orchestra celebration of John Williams' music for concert hall and film this week, and Sunday’s concert will be broadcast LIVE at 2 PM here on WRTI. The centerpiece of this program will be John Williams’ Cello Concerto, written specifically for Yo-Yo Ma, at the suggestion of Seiji Ozawa.
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History will be made when The Philadelphia Orchestra kicks off its 2016 Asia Tour with two concerts at the Hong Kong Cultural Centre. And you'll be right there! WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is traveling across the globe to China to bring you both performances live, in real time, on WRTI. Tune in at 90.1 FM in Philadelphia, or listen online at WRTI.org.

Exploring Passover's Musical History

Apr 29, 2016

This week, Passover is being celebrated by millions of the Jewish faith. And while the Christian holiday of Easter has inspired Bach's Saint Matthew Passion and many other beloved classical works, Passover claims no famous pieces in the concert repertoire. WRTI's Debra Lew Harder explores why.

Sharon Torello

Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia, founded in 1874, is a largely volunteer chorus of about 140 members.  As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, its new artistic director taps into the joy of singing to celebrate the past, present, and future of choral music.


Join us on Saturday afternoon after the The Metropolitan Opera broadcast of Richard Strauss' ELEKTRA (at approximately 3 pm) to hear the mega-talented resident artists of the Academy of Vocal Arts sing Puccini! You'll hear two of the one-act operas from Il Trittico - GIANNI SCHICCHI AND IL TABARRO (the cloak).

Barry Lively

The Choral Arts Philadelphia concert series, Bach@7, has a new modern name on its May 4th concert program: Andrew Lipke — a singer/guitarist better known at local pop music clubs — in his new oratorio titled The Plague. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports how contagious it might be. 

For a musician, the words “sanctuary,” “retreat,” and “haven” suggest attractive possibilities for creative expression. The Jazz Residency Program at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts isn’t based on the isolation these places evoke, but it does provide an environment conducive to a creative stream. The program is aimed at local jazz artists who can write music.

Jazz great Billie Holiday, who died at age 44 in 1959, was posthumously inducted into the Philadelphia Music Alliance Walk of Fame on October 26th.  Lady Day would have turned 100 on April 7, 2015

One hundred years ago, a musician was born who took the world by storm, both with his violin and with his warmhearted humanity. Yehudi Menuhin was born April 22, 1916, in the Bronx to Russian immigrants. He began his career as an astounding child prodigy in velvet knee pants. But two men who knew him well — documentary filmmaker Bruno Monsaingeon and violinist Daniel Hope — maintain that as Menuhin grew older, he turned out to be far more than just another virtuoso.

For more than 10 years, Diana Panton has been quietly building her jazz career. She's also a high-school French teacher by day, which means she mostly records and tours while her students are on vacation. But on her latest album, she's aiming for a new audience.

George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue is performed by orchestras everywhere. But not everyone has heard the original jazz band version, composed for a 1924 experimental concert that blurred the boundaries between jazz and classical music. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.


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WRTI Arts Desk

Exploring Passover's Musical History

Apr 29, 2016

This week, Passover is being celebrated by millions of the Jewish faith. And while the Christian holiday of Easter has inspired Bach's Saint Matthew Passion and many other beloved classical works, Passover claims no famous pieces in the concert repertoire. WRTI's Debra Lew Harder explores why.

Sharon Torello

Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia, founded in 1874, is a largely volunteer chorus of about 140 members.  As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, its new artistic director taps into the joy of singing to celebrate the past, present, and future of choral music.


In 2011, the Philadelphia-based, South-Africa born singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Andrew Lipke released his fourth album, The Plague, with much fanfare, including a live interview and performance on WHYY's Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane, and lots of coverage on WXPN.  Fast forward to 2015, when he's approached by Matthew Glandorf, artistic director of Choral Arts Philadelphia, with an idea.

Barry Lively

The Choral Arts Philadelphia concert series, Bach@7, has a new modern name on its May 4th concert program: Andrew Lipke — a singer/guitarist better known at local pop music clubs — in his new oratorio titled The Plague. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports how contagious it might be. 

For a musician, the words “sanctuary,” “retreat,” and “haven” suggest attractive possibilities for creative expression. The Jazz Residency Program at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts isn’t based on the isolation these places evoke, but it does provide an environment conducive to a creative stream. The program is aimed at local jazz artists who can write music.

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